Posts

Showing posts from March, 2016

Weekend / Stuff

Image

Tackett / Thursday

Image

Weekend / Stuff

Image
It was a single lamp kind of weekend.

Black Mountain College / Hammer

Image
Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957 Hammer museum

Black Mountain College (BMC) was an experimental school located in Black Mountain, North Carolina. It opened in 1933 and was owned by the faculty. Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Buckminister Fuller, Robert Motherwell, Charles Olson, and Xanti Schawinsky is just a partial list of the faculty. Ruth Asawa, Kenneth Noland, John Chamberlain, Cy Twombly, and Robert Rauschenberg were all associated with the school. BMC closed in 1957.Source: Western Regional Archives, States Archives of North Carolina
Josef Albers painting and a desk he designed for the college
Anni Albers
Josef Albers
Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller
Source: State Archives of North Carolina
Emerson Woelffer
Ilya Bolotowsky

Robert Rauschenberg
Ingeborg Svarc Lauterstein and Rauschenberg at BMC. I bet at lot of good times were had there. 
Source:

Tackett / Thursday

Image
La Gardo Tackett totem at the home of Max Lawrence, the owner of Architectural Pottery. Photo: Julius Shulman

Weekend / Stuff

Image
How often is there a J.B. Blunk ceramic in the car when driving by a Noguchi garden?
Inco Products

Japanese Memphis

Nonoalco-Tlatelolco / Mexico City

Image
Nonoalco-Tlatelolco (1964) is the largest apartment complex in Mexico and the second largest in North America. The plan, by architect Mario Pani, included 102 residential towers with plazas and public space in between. It was based on Le Corbusier's concept of towers in the park. Built as a mixed-income solution to a looming housing crisis resulting from urbanization, the city within a city included schools, recreation, businesses, gardens, hospitals, and art. The development was home to 80,000 people.




Source: Browne Barnes
Tlatelolco started as a city-state on the shore of Lake Texcoco and was overtaken by the ascendant Aztecs. During the conquest of Mexico by Cortés, in 1521, Tlatelolco was the last battleground between the Aztecs and the Spanish. Cortés's conquistadors won the fight, and 40,000 Aztecs were killed. There is now a plaque on the site that reads: “The battle was not a triumph, nor was it a defeat. It was the painful birth of the mestizonation that is the Mexico of…